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Migrant domestic workers from Burma to Thailand

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Published by Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University in Nakhonpathom, Thailand .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 216-220).

Statement[Awatsaya Panam ... et al.].
SeriesIPSR publication ;, no. 286
ContributionsAwatsaya Panam., Mahāwitthayālai Mahidon. Sathāban Wičhai Prachākō̜n læ Sangkhom.
The Physical Object
Paginationxxv, 228 p. :
Number of Pages228
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3362172M
ISBN 109749716132
LC Control Number2004420575
OCLC/WorldCa57442333

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